How much do dog dental cleanings cost?

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The average cost of dog dental cleaning can be hard to calculate as there are now many different methods to clean a dog’s teeth.

You also need to factor in the different prices across different practices and how much cleaning your dog’s teeth need. Hopefully, we will be able to help clear up the muddy waters of dog dental cleanings and help you find some low-cost dog dental cleaning alternatives!

Types of dog dental cleaning

There are now many alternatives to a regular dog dental cleaning that are a little cheaper and can be way less stressful for your dog.

Ultrasonic Dental Cleaning

For an older dog or a dog that cannot cope with anesthesia, ultrasonic dental cleanings can be a great alternative. A little bit of a lower price also makes this an awesome low-cost dental cleaning avenue that can be explored.

The ultrasound waves can clean deeper below the gum line and offer much more effective results than traditional dental cleaning.

To find the nearest practice to you that offers this treatment just do a quick google search for ‘dog ultrasonic dental cleanings in …’ and add your area.

This method is becoming much more popular as more people are becoming certified to do it. Some ultrasonic cleaning teams will even be happy to complete the treatment in your home which can be a much nicer experience for nervous pets!

The cost of ultrasonic dental cleanings is between $50 and $100 per session. The price of ultrasonic dog dental cleanings in NYC is closer to the $100 mark whereas in Texas you could be looking at just $50.

Level 1 dog dental clean and polish

This is your basic dental cleaning procedure. If you regularly brush your dog’s teeth at home this could be all that is needed. This level of cleaning is just to remove minimal amounts of tartar without any bleeding gums or need for any serious treatment afterward.

If you are lucky enough to only need this level of treatment, it will cost between $200 and $250. The level 1 dog dental clean usually includes all of the professionals needed to administer anesthetic and a qualified vet or vet nurse to clean and examine your pup’s teeth.

Level 2 dog dental clean and polish

Level 2 dog dental clean treatment is where after an examination your dog is found to have good overall oral health with only minor bleeding of the gums and moderate build-up of tartar.

This could be if you only brush your dog’s teeth every now and then or perhaps you own a slightly older dog. The cost of this treatment would be between $250 and $300.

Level 3 dog dental clean and polish

Level 3 dog dental clean is where there has been a reasonable build-up of tartar that needs removing and your dog is showing signs of Periodontal disease.

The vet will work to minimize any future tooth loss or issues that may occur because of this. This may come with a few tooth extractions and the removal of any infected tissue. The cost of this level of treatment can reach $1,000 depending on the amount of infected tissue and tooth extractions needed. Sometimes it can be a little less if your dog is only just within the boundaries of Level 3.

Level 4 dog dental clean and polish

Unfortunately, this means your vet has found severe levels of tartar on your dog’s teeth and pretty severe Periodontal disease.

This option is already in the realm of managing the established disease and finding ways to minimize the effects that have started to take place.

The vet may need to check the organs of your dog and monitor for secondary heart disease. This treatment will remove any non-vital teeth and infected tissue and possibly involve long-term pain management solutions along with a specialist diet.

The cost of the level 4 dog dental clean treatment can go as high as $3,000 and you may need to look into future costs for pain medication, further extractions, and specialized dietary requirements from your vet.

How much is the cost of a dog dental cleaning with anesthesia?

Most dog dental cleanings will require anesthesia unless your dog is unbelievably tolerant with its mouth being examined and its dental health is very good.

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Most vets will require your dog to be examined thoroughly under anesthesia in order to get a decent look at your dog’s back teeth. It also makes sure your vet is kept safe in case your dog has any fear or pain-related aggression once being examined. The only way a professional can clean your dog’s teeth without anesthesia is by using ultrasonic methods.

Blood work with dental cleanings

While your dog is under anesthesia, your vet will usually take some blood samples to send to the lab. This is even more usual if your dog is at level 3 or 4 in its dental health.

The cost of blood work with dental cleanings is between $170 and $200 if you choose to have a full chemistry panel done. If you have an older dog or a dog who is suffering from an undiagnosed condition, this can be the ideal time to conduct a decent health check.

Preventative treatments

In order to prevent a large bill to fix your dog’s poor dental hygiene there are some little extras you can add to your daily routine to help keep your dog’s teeth healthy.

Regular brushing with a doggy toothbrush and paste can be a great step in the right direction. Some owners choose to brush their dog’s teeth before bedtime every night which has been shown to have a positive effect on their dog’s dental health in the long run.

Keep your dog nice and calm while doing this and ask for a second person to help if you need to. You can get toothpaste that has delicious flavors for your dog too – just be sure you don’t confuse the beef paste with the mint!

Dental treats and chews can also be a fun way to occupy your dog and clean their teeth. There are many specially designed chews aimed at keeping your dogs mouth healthy. Depending on the brand you pick, these treats can be given daily or a few times a month.

This option can add up a little over time, unlike brushing which is very cheap to maintain. This option is great if your dog dislikes having its mouth handled or is just not happy with you brushing its teeth.

Larger kibbles! Some brands of dog food offer a dental variety that aims to keep your dog’s teeth clean. These lines are often more expensive but if your dog is prone to dental issues, they can be a great addition along with regular brushing at home.

What is the cost of a dog dental extraction?

Depending on the practice doing the procedure, some vets will only charge $15 per tooth extraction. This is not so bad considering the overall cost of a dental cleaning.

How to find low-cost dog dental cleaning in my area?

Ask around with other dog owners. If you are a frequent visitor at the dog park then don’t be afraid to ask other owners about the price of their dog’s dental cleanings.

Another alternative is to run a quick google search ‘dog dental cleanings in …’ and add your area or ‘low-cost dog dental cleanings …’. The easiest way to find the lowest costs is by doing a little research before you commit to a particular practice. Don’t be scared to call your pet insurance either and ask about their coverage on dental cleanings. Some providers will be able to cover a certain percentage of the treatment or even all of it depending on the package you are paying for.

If you are super lucky, your regular vet might offer a care package including deworming, vaccinations, flea treatment, and dental cleanings. If they do, this is usually a monthly payment that can save a little bit of money than if you were to pay for everything individually. A bonus is that it is broken down into smaller regular payments instead of one huge bill!

Some practices will also be happy to discuss a payment plan with you. This is especially useful if your dog needs a bigger procedure.