The Impact of Inflation on Dog Food Prices

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Inflation is hitting markets worldwide, increasing the price of food, household bills, and the overall cost of living. But how is it impacting the price of dog food? 

To get an idea of the price of dog food, we need to start by looking at human food.

According to historical trends, pet food will closely follow the price of human food. If food prices are down, so is dog food. Unfortunately, with most human food hitting new annual highs earlier this year, dog food is also on the rise. 

Dog Food Prices Hit New Highs Three Months In a Row

In July this year, U.S. pet food inflation reached new peaks of 10.9%, up from 10.3% in June. This means if you were paying $10 a week for dog food, you’d be paying at least $11 by August. 

This rise impacted not only the dog food market but dog products as a whole. It was estimated that pet products increased an average of 9.1%, which made having a dog significantly more expensive than it was one year prior. 

August brought more bad news for dog food prices, with an additional inflation rise to a total of 13.1%. August was the closest dog food prices have been to human food, which reached highs of 13.5%. 

This rise means the price of pet food is starting to match the price increases of pet care, veterinary costs, and general dog treats. However, it’s not all bad news. When looking at the historical prices of pet food, general prices have been steadily on the rise, which means the new increases shouldn’t cause overwhelming problems. Nonetheless, dog food analysts such as John Gibbons have warned pet owners that they could be in for a long ride when it comes to dog food prices. 

The Public Reaction To Rising Dog Food Prices

In April 2022, NielsenIQ launched a public survey of dog owners to learn about the product purchasing plans for the year. Two-thirds of respondents stated that even with the increase in price, they wouldn’t “trade down” to a lower-priced alternative. This suggested that while unhappy with the increase, most dog owners would continue to pay full price. 

However, some respondents suggested that they may buy smaller packages and look for ways to supplement their dog’s food in the short run to save on costs. With prices increasing almost monthly, it’s possible that many dog owners will be doing the same. So how exactly can you supplement your dog’s food?

How Can You Counter Inflation?

With inflation not slowing any time soon, it’s a good idea to start thinking of ways you can feed your dog without breaking the bank. Here are three inexpensive ways to increase the amount of food your dog’s eating.

Raw Eggs

We have a love-hate relationship with raw eggs. Some people drink them as part of their protein shake, and others feel sick at the thought of doing so. But did you know raw eggs are an almost complete source of nutrition for dogs? Eggs provide many of the vitamins your dog needs to thrive, including:

  • Vitamin A
  • Fatty acids
  • Folate
  • Selenium
  • Ion
  • Vitamin B12

Now, this isn’t to say you should be feeding your dog raw eggs all day every day. But you can supplement meals with raw eggs a few days a week. Instead of giving your dog a full portion, give them half and an egg or two, depending on their size. And remember: don’t cook the egg, as this will kill many of its nutrients. 

As well as the raw egg, you can also feed your dog the egg shells. Shells are an important source of calcium for dogs, and they can eat and digest them with ease. If, for any reason, you can’t feed a whole eggshell to your dog, try grinding them up in a blender. 

If you choose to feed them the shell, make sure you buy your eggs from a local or organic farmer as many commercial brands spray their eggshells with chemicals to make them look shiny- you don’t want your dog eating that!

Bone Broth

Bone broth is a great way to supplement your dog’s diet and keep them hydrated. It has several benefits, including healthy digestion, and better joint health, and it also detoxes the liver. It also tastes amazing, so unlike water which your dog may be hesitant to drink, your dog won’t be able to get enough.

When you’re using bone broth for the first time add one tablespoon of broth per 20 lbs of body weight. Alternatively, you can freeze the broth in an ice cube and give it to your dog as a treat. The serving size isn’t essential, but this is a good guideline to follow. 

Pureed Fruit And Vegetables 

If your dog eats a raw dog food diet then fruit and vegetables may already be part of their routine. However, if you’re looking for an inexpensive way to supplement your dog food, then pureed fruit and vegetables are a great option. They provide your dog with a range of antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals and are relatively inexpensive compared to most dog foods. 

Much like raw eggs, you don’t want to just feed them pureed fruit and vegetables. Supplement their current dog food or mix it into what they’re already eating. Do this a few days a week and you can save on dog food and still ensure your dog has a healthy diet.

The Future Of Inflation On Dog Food Prices

As the year comes to an end we’re seeing the price of dog food continue to increase, but there’s no way of knowing how long this will go on. 

As a dog owner, you can continue to pay full price for dog food, or look for ways to supplement their diet. If you have the storage space, you can also bulk buy your dog food for a discount on your order. This will help you stay stocked up and prevent the effect of monthly dog food price increases.

No matter your choice, be proactive with your planning to make sure your dog can enjoy a balanced diet no matter what the inflation rate does.